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Karen Taylor-Goodrich - North Cascades National Park

 

Karen Taylor-Goodrich has been selected as the new superintendent of North Cascades National Park Service Complex.

Taylor-Goodrich has been the superintendent at Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks in California for the last three years; she recently transitioned to her new duties at North Cascades.  She replaces the former superintendent at North Cascades, Chip Jenkins, who left the park last year to become the deputy regional director for Pacific West Region in Seattle.

“Karen is a proven leader who has successfully managed complex and controversial issues for the National Park Service at the local, national, and international levels,” said Regional Director Chris Lehnertz. “Karen’s collaborative management style and strong background in visitor and resource protection and management, especially in wilderness and wildland fire, will be a great asset to the North Cascades.”

Taylor-Goodrich previously served as the associate director for visitor and resource protection in the Washington Office and has more than 30 years of experience directing a wide variety of operational programs at Yosemite, Grand Canyon, Lake Roosevelt, Cumberland Island, and National Capital Parks-East. Her extensive international work experience includes advancing protected area management projects in Tanzania, sister park agreements in Cambodia and China, a trans-boundary wilderness management agreement among Mexico, Canada and the United States, and international government manager forums for several World Wilderness Congress agendas.  

Taylor-Goodrich received a bachelor of science degree in geography from Portland State University in Portland, Oregon, with additional graduate work in natural resources management.

“I’m excited about the many opportunities and challenges the North Cascades Complex presents,” said Taylor-Goodrich. “Returning to work and live in the Pacific Northwest has been a long-time goal, and I look forward to working closely with the park staff, local communities, park partners, and our interagency and Canadian colleagues to protect and conserve this very special region.”